Home sweet home on one of my all time favorite sites, Refinery 29!

http://www.refinery29.com/melissa-magsaysay-home-photos

Mxx

Home sweet home on one of my all time favorite sites, Refinery 29!

http://www.refinery29.com/melissa-magsaysay-home-photos

Mxx

Hit the road, Jack! “City of Style” Coast to Coast with 7FAM

What will you wear this summer? Check out my favorite items for a little light traveling or just hanging around the beach in the coming months.

"Scope Melissa Magsaysay’s favorite 7FAM road trip essentials and travel in style this summer: http://bit.ly/LxNpLs

I’ve partnered with denim label 7 For All Mankind on a month long “City of Style” Coast to Coast tour! Check out their Facebook page as well as Pintrest for all of the exclusive interviews, giveaways, product picks, events and pictures as we explore personal style from the west to east coast!

"City of Style" Pintrest page: http://pinterest.com/7forallmankind/city-of-style-west-coast/

7 For All Mankind Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/7ForAllMankind

xxM

I’ve partnered with denim label 7 For All Mankind on a month long “City of Style” Coast to Coast tour! Check out their Facebook page as well as Pintrest for all of the exclusive interviews, giveaways, product picks, events and pictures as we explore personal style from the west to east coast!

"City of Style" Pintrest page: http://pinterest.com/7forallmankind/city-of-style-west-coast/

7 For All Mankind Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/7ForAllMankind

xxM

"City of Style" on Extra and Style.com!

There’s been some wonderful press on “City of Style” lately. In addition to the great hits following the launch party at 3.1 Phillip Lim a few weeks ago, Extra ran some fun coverage as well as Style.com and Glamour.com.

Check out the Extra footage here:

http://pdl.warnerbros.com/wbol/us/telepictures/extra/060412_extra_extra_wknd.mov

A MASSIVE thank you to Brittany of I Wanna Be Gwyneth http://iwannabegwyneth.tumblr.com/ for the amazing Extra coverage! xxM

and Style.com coverage here: http://www.style.com/stylefile/2012/05/surfer-skater-chola-star/

Everything’s Coming Up Turquoise

Feeling flirty, free and fun was the vibe of the bohemian Angelenos in the 1960s, and is an aesthetic that we frequently parley into our wardrobe choices. One way to accent a floral maxi dress, or add a colorful pop of “wow” to a muted earth-tone top, is through the use of turquoise jewelry. These timeless, bright baubles guarantee to keep you at the top of the fashion hit list regardless of whether you spend $50 or $5,000. We love the touch of boho luxe jewels like the Alexis Bittar Crystal Encrusted Gold and Turquoise Bracelet above ($345) as well as these Dannijo Cash Turquoise and Swarovski Drop Earrings ($295). The small square of a turquoise stone in the center of a 24K House of Harlow 1960 Cocktail Ring ($65) is a fantastic everyday staple, as is Chan Luu’s Turquoise and Light Azore Natural Brown Leather Wrap Bracelet ($195). To offset a great bohemian dress, we are lusting after Michael Kors simple and chic Turquoise Tubular Pave Detailed Bead Necklace ($175) and Kelly Wearstler’s Chain Point Turquoise Necklace ($395). When it comes to turquoise, a little splash can make all the different.

‘City of Style’ Party Draws L.A.’s Fashion and Film Crowd


Love this great party coverage from my friend, talented writer and former WWD colleague Michelle Dalton Tyree. Her new site www.fashiontrendsdaily.com is certainly poised to become the next online style resource! xxM

http://www.fashiontrendsdaily.com/events/melissa-magsaysay-city-of-style-book-party-brings-out-l-a-s-fashion-and-film-crowd

City of Style officially launches with a party at 3.1 Phillip Lim!

The book officially went on sale yesterday and we celebrated with a really fun party at the gorgeous 3.1 Phillip Lim boutique in West Hollywood. Celeb supporters like Mandy Moore, Minka Kelly and Kristen Bell turned out, all clad in candy colored Phillip Lim dresses of course, as well as amazing friends like hosts/super stylists Nicole Chavez and Emily Current and Meritt Elliott.

A massive thank you to everyone who turned out. I hope you had as much as I did. And to anyone who still hasn’t snagged their copy. What are you waiting for?http://www.amazon.com/dp/0062088408/ref=rdr_ext_sb_ti_hist_1 

xx M

I had the chance to interview Alice Bag for “City of Style” and learned that she’s not only a pioneer in the punk music scene, but a style pioneer as well, fusing punk elements with Chola-style for a look completely her own and totally ahead of its time. xxM


violencegirl:

Thanks for posting regarding your reactions to my statement that I didn’t experience sexism in the early LA punk scene (note that I speak only of my personal experience; I wouldn’t make a blanket statement that sexism or racism didn’t exist in the scene or that no one else experienced those things.) I can understand how this would be hard to accept for people who weren’t there at the time but I take exception to the assumption that I somehow had an easier time because of my association with already well-respected male musicians. This was definitely not the case. I only expected people to accept me as an artist and a creative person on my own terms, first and foremost. I wanted to play on an equal footing with male artists and musicians, so I put myself in a position to do so and I did it. My place was never accorded to me by others - I just did what I wanted to do. I still do. 


I suspect that any progressive social or art movement (like punk rock was in the 70’s) is much more egalitarian by nature, simply because of the small number of “prime movers.” Plus, the early LA punk scene prided itself on its heterogeneous makeup: it was all about celebrating otherness, and not about codified looks, behavior or attitudes. I think if you read my book, you might come away with a better picture of what the early scene was like and what our artistic communities can become when they embrace our differences.

Thanks for hearing me out,
Alice
cocoku:

mujer-encabronada:

I don’t think I have rebelled against Latin@ culture. I have rebelled against those who try to make me warm tortillas for my brothers when they can warm them for themselves, I have rebelled against a patriarchal religion. I rebel against small mindedness in all ways and in every situation but those things are not an intrinsic part of latin@ culture and I will fight tooth and nail against anyone who tries to make me feel like I’m less Chican@ for not embracing the small-mindedness.
- Alice Bag, interview on 1/23/12

When I saw Alice Bag speak and perform recently, I was shocked to hear her say that she didn’t feel as though there was any sexism in the punk scene when she was starting out. I have a tough time believing that. I haven’t gotten around to reading the book yet, but a friend of mine who has suggested that because of her associations with already well-respected male musicians, she would have been treated like royalty from the get-go. That’s one of the shitty, insidious things about sexism: as a woman, you need men to vouch for your legitimacy as an artist, a professional, a person, in order to be treated as “equal” by men and women who have internalized misogyny. I think it’s really great that Alice Bag didn’t feel like she was impeded by sexism, but it was disappointing to hear that she felt it wasn’t there at all.
I had the chance to interview Alice Bag for “City of Style” and learned that she’s not only a pioneer in the punk music scene, but a style pioneer as well, fusing punk elements with Chola-style for a look completely her own and totally ahead of its time. xxM

violencegirl:

Thanks for posting regarding your reactions to my statement that I didn’t experience sexism in the early LA punk scene (note that I speak only of my personal experience; I wouldn’t make a blanket statement that sexism or racism didn’t exist in the scene or that no one else experienced those things.) I can understand how this would be hard to accept for people who weren’t there at the time but I take exception to the assumption that I somehow had an easier time because of my association with already well-respected male musicians. This was definitely not the case. I only expected people to accept me as an artist and a creative person on my own terms, first and foremost. I wanted to play on an equal footing with male artists and musicians, so I put myself in a position to do so and I did it. My place was never accorded to me by others - I just did what I wanted to do. I still do. I suspect that any progressive social or art movement (like punk rock was in the 70’s) is much more egalitarian by nature, simply because of the small number of “prime movers.” Plus, the early LA punk scene prided itself on its heterogeneous makeup: it was all about celebrating otherness, and not about codified looks, behavior or attitudes. I think if you read my book, you might come away with a better picture of what the early scene was like and what our artistic communities can become when they embrace our differences. Thanks for hearing me out, Alice

cocoku:

mujer-encabronada:

I don’t think I have rebelled against Latin@ culture. I have rebelled against those who try to make me warm tortillas for my brothers when they can warm them for themselves, I have rebelled against a patriarchal religion. I rebel against small mindedness in all ways and in every situation but those things are not an intrinsic part of latin@ culture and I will fight tooth and nail against anyone who tries to make me feel like I’m less Chican@ for not embracing the small-mindedness.

- Alice Bag, interview on 1/23/12

When I saw Alice Bag speak and perform recently, I was shocked to hear her say that she didn’t feel as though there was any sexism in the punk scene when she was starting out. I have a tough time believing that. I haven’t gotten around to reading the book yet, but a friend of mine who has suggested that because of her associations with already well-respected male musicians, she would have been treated like royalty from the get-go. That’s one of the shitty, insidious things about sexism: as a woman, you need men to vouch for your legitimacy as an artist, a professional, a person, in order to be treated as “equal” by men and women who have internalized misogyny. I think it’s really great that Alice Bag didn’t feel like she was impeded by sexism, but it was disappointing to hear that she felt it wasn’t there at all.

(Source: mrmean, via violencegirl-deactivated2014061)

Skater, Surfer, Chola, Star…on Style.com

Awesome coverage on “City of Style” from my favorite fashion website, www.style.com

Read it here:

http://www.style.com/stylefile/2012/05/surfer-skater-chola-star/

xxM

Cameron Silver’s Met Gala Suit

Cameron Silver, a dear friend of mine as well as founder and co-owner of L.A.’s vintage boutique DECADES, had the honor of accompanying Nicole Miller to the Metropolitan Museum Gala this year. Miller’s signature style typically incorporates bright prints and patterns that grew from an early “obsession” with Celtic knots. 

Instantly, I was spellbound by the colors in Silver’s suit, which turned out to be a screen print of old ticket stubs inspired by a Miller print from the 80’s. He paired the smart suit with a custom Edwing D’Angelo shirt, Lanvin bow tie and a vintage Elsa Schiaparelli sequined blowfish walking stick. Silver’s aesthetic in and out of his store consistently remind me that the past is not so bad after all…especially when it comes brightly package.

Cameron Silver’s Met Gala Suit

Cameron Silver, a dear friend of mine as well as founder and co-owner of L.A.’s vintage boutique DECADES, had the honor of accompanying Nicole Miller to the Metropolitan Museum Gala this year. Miller’s signature style typically incorporates bright prints and patterns that grew from an early “obsession” with Celtic knots.

Instantly, I was spellbound by the colors in Silver’s suit, which turned out to be a screen print of old ticket stubs inspired by a Miller print from the 80’s. He paired the smart suit with a custom Edwing D’Angelo shirt, Lanvin bow tie and a vintage Elsa Schiaparelli sequined blowfish walking stick. Silver’s aesthetic in and out of his store consistently remind me that the past is not so bad after all…especially when it comes brightly package.